Tag: Michele Kau

Sweet Lorane Community News, September 26, 2019

Fern Ridge Review
Creswell Chronicle
Sweet Lorane Community News
September 26, 2019
By Pat Edwards

This past week was the beginning of fall, and it certainly feels as though it’s earlier than usual, weather-wise. I’ve always enjoyed the cooler, sunny days of fall that we usually have through September and into October, but Mother Nature is keeping us guessing on what each of our tomorrows is to bring this year.

With fall comes the beginning of football, volleyball and cross-country seasons at the area schools. How I miss having a son, daughter or grandchildren in high school or middle school who participate in athletics. I’ve packed away Jim’s and my red and white Crow High School jackets with the names and uniform numbers of our grandkids on the sleeves. We cheered on so many of their games, both at home and away and I miss that. Our daughter, Michele Kau, and her daughter—our granddaughter—Stephanie Furlong, have gone on to coach volleyball. Michele stepped down as the head coach at Crow last year, but Stephanie has taken on the head coaching job for Glide High School east of Roseburg. We still try to make it to at least one of their games each season, although those bleachers are getting harder to sit on as well as climb. At least our one granddaughter, Natalie, who attends Creswell High School, participates in music and drama events that we can attend and so enjoy.

Along with school sports, fall brings harvest festivals and Halloween events. Trick or treating has morphed into the much safer “trunk or treating” where parent and community members park their cars In the Lorane Church parking lot and decorate their cars’ trunks with orange and black and provide treats for the ghosts and goblins who come to fill their jack-o-lanterns. The adults and children are also treated to hot chocolate, spiced cider, coffee and other goodies while standing around outdoor heaters (and under canopies, if it rains) while visiting.

How I remember when the Lorane Elementary School hosted its annual carnival in the gymnasium. It was so popular and usually filled to capacity while young and old alike would gather to watch the children run to the various booths to fish for prizes and do the ring toss and bean bag throw. Some tried shooting basketball free throws for tickets; others had their faces painted with unicorns and rainbows. And then there was the annual lollipop tree which sported hundreds of Dum-Dum suckers. One of the biggest events was the cake walk. Cakes and cupcakes of all flavors and sizes were won if you were on the magic number when the music stopped. Bingo, too, was a popular event for the adults, especially.

While the Lorane Carnival is no more, Crow’s Applegate Elementary is planning a Harvest Festival on October 25 from 6:30 to 9:00 p.m. this year. They are advertising it as a fun evening of carnival games (some are from Lorane’s carnival), trick-or-treating, costume contests and a haunted house.

And did I mention bingo? Yes, our three local granges—Lorane, Crow and Creswell—will be offering cash prizes and lots of fun for all ages this fall as they sponsor dinners and bingo games as fundraisers.

The Lorane Grange will have their Spaghetti Dinner and Bingo nights beginning October 18—a Friday night—with dinner beginning at 5:30 and bingo at 6:30 p.m. They charge $5 for a “2-on” pack or $10 for a “4-on” pack plus $1 or $2 a sheet for the blackout game. The jackpot was won last spring, so it will be starting again with $100-plus for the featured blackout game.

The Crow Grange starts again with dinner and bingo on Saturday, October 5. They serve a delicious dinner, usually provided by Dan and Connie Suing or Ruth Teafatiller, beginning at 6:00 p.m. and bingo starts at 7:00. The cost is $17 for a buy-in. Their jackpot was not won last spring, so it has built to over $500.

The Creswell Grange sponsors a bingo night every third Wednesday of each month. The doors open at 6:00 p.m. and games start at 7:00. The cost is $15 for 14 regular games and a blackout game. Their blackout pot is up to $300. They don’t have dinner, but they provide free coffee, tea and popcorn.

Good times are ahead! So, let’s support our schools, granges and other community organizations in any way we can to maintain our strong communities.

Sweet Lorane Community News, May 2, 2019

Fern Ridge Review
Creswell Chronicle
Sweet Lorane Community News
May 2, 2019
By Pat Edwards

May has arrived, my flower beds and boxes are taking shape, and the pace of life is obviously speeding up a bit for everyone. With the sunshine and warmer temperatures, there is suddenly the desire to get out and “do something.”

At its meeting this past week, the Lorane Grange discussed the annual booth at the Lane County Fair as well as its spring clean-up of the Grange Cemetery which sits on the hill next to King Estate. I know that they will welcome volunteers to help with the cemetery. Contact Gary or Lil Thompson or any other grange member if you would like to participate. I’ll try to include details in next week’s column.

For those of us who love and care for our “Lorane Warrior,” Michael Matchulat, he could use a few more of our thoughts and prayers at this time. Jim and I are sending ours.

Last Wednesday morning, there was a very interesting event taking place at Crow High/Middle School, but it was one I opted to find out more about after-the-fact. They held a pre-prom assembly that strangely held a bit more meaning to me than it normally would have. Outside the school, a real-life re-enactment of a horrific car crash took place. Two cars were involved in what was described as a car-full of teenagers who had been drinking, on their way home after the prom. The other car had adults in it who were unlucky enough to have been in the wrong place at the wrong time. The scenario involved real-life paramedics, ambulances and life-flight crews who were on hand to remove and tend to the passenger casualties from the wreckages.

The roles of the passengers were played by school students and teachers… among them, our daughter, Michele Kau. Each one of the role-players were made up to show specific injuries and conditions. From the pictures I saw, there was lots of “blood” and makeup to show “wounds” and “broken bones.” I understand that it was very realistic and, according to Michele, “It impacted a lot of kids in a way that will hopefully make them think twice about making dangerous choices.”

I applaud the school for providing this wake-up call to its students. The reason I decided not to witness it was fairly obvious… it was gruesome… but what clinched the decision was the fact that I could not bear the thought of watching the “jaws of life” extricate my daughter’s supposedly “dead body” from a crumbled wreckage. That just hits too close to home.

On a sunnier note, I have been noticing, this spring, an unusual abundance of beautiful blue flowers in the pastures around Lorane, probably due to our recent flooding—they like to grow in moist meadows. These flowers are the blue camas, and they were a very popular and cultivated food source for the Native American tribes who lived in this area. After being harvested in the spring and early summer months, the bulbs were pit-roasted or boiled. According to Wikipedia, “A pit-cooked camas bulb looks and tastes something like baked sweet potato, but sweeter, and with more crystalline fibers due to the presence of inulin in the bulbs…”

Camas

Photo by Martin McClure of Lorane

Seeing these beautiful flowers in the fields provides a connection to the past for me.

A Bit of Lorane History

“The nearest tribes in the area were the Chelamela, the Yoncalla Kalapuyas, the Siuslaws, and the Lower Umpquas. All spoke Chinook jargon, made up of 500 words, which evolved from the various tribes. Primarily, they had the same type of life-style. Their chief food sources came from the abundant plant and animal life in the Siuslaw Valley. Their main staples were acorns, hazelnuts, camas, fish, roots, game and berries. The local tribes regularly practiced field burning to harvest dried wild wheat pods and to control the growth of vegetation. They took advantage each fall of the plentiful supply of salmon provided during the salmon runs in the Siuslaw and Smith Rivers and the connecting streams…

“…Each spring, the members of the tribes would often leave for their favorite hunting or gathering grounds, living in temporary shelters all throughout the spring and summer months. There were no strict territorial boundaries between the tribes and most seemed to agree that no man should own the land, and they respected the areas where their neighbors dwelled…” (From Sawdust & Cider, 1987, 2006)

Sweet Lorane Community News, April 5, 2018

Fern Ridge Review
Creswell Chronicle
Sweet Lorane Community News
April 5, 2018
By Pat Edwards

We got the news yesterday that the Crow High School band, led by Music Director Extraordinaire, Pat Dixon, has been selected to represent Oregon in the “Parade of Heroes” in Washington, D.C. over Veterans Day weekend. According to our daughter, Michele Kau, Teacher Extraordinaire at Crow, the band is desperately needing help with funding to make the trip happen. They are accepting cash donations and have begun a fundraising effort by selling really great-looking t-shirts to commemorate the trip. The t-shirt order link can be found on the Lorane, Oregon and Crow Community Facebook pages and more information is available by calling the school at 541-935-2227. Let’s show our pride and help make this happen for our local student/musicians!

Speaking of Crow Middle/High School, we also got word that last week – sometime between Friday, March 30 and Sunday, April 1, someone broke into the auto shop at the high school and stole multiple items that belong to the school. It has been so exciting to see our schools providing vocational classes again for our students and to have this one crippled by tools and equipment being stolen over Spring Break, is very upsetting. If anyone has any information on the theft, please contact the sheriff’s office and the school.

Once again, we don’t have a lot of news to report this week. This time, I’m going to tell you a little about when the stage route that went through Lorane was changed…

A Little Bit of Lorane History:

The Divide landmark is located at the I-5 exit 170. It marks the little-noticed pass that divides the Umpqua River watershed from the Willamette River watershed—Southern Oregon from Northern Oregon. It is here where a traveler can return to U.S. Highway 99, now called the Goshen-Divide Highway, to visit the towns where the highway once brought prosperity.

At one time, there was a post office called Divide that was established on May 31, 1900 and was closed on January 15, 1921. It may have been moved across county borders, or its county designation may have changed in a boundary shift between Lane and Douglas counties.

After 1865, the stagecoaches no longer used the steep Territorial Road to cross the Calapooya Mountains, past the Cartwright House/Mountain House Hotel and Lorane on their way to Eugene City. Instead, they were rerouted by way of an old road which wound through Pass Creek Canyon. The road was poor, soft and muddy along the creek bottom and the canyon passage was narrow.

Robert H. Ward, who lived at the southern end of the new route, built a corduroy road by laying 8-foot cedar logs side by side across the road through the pass. This road became known as Ward’s Toll Road, with Ward collecting a toll from northbound travelers and Ira Hawley collecting the southbound tolls.

On the stage route, Hawley’s Station was located 10 miles north of Estes Ranch on the Ira B. Hawley Donation Land Claim. It provided a rest stop and a horse-changing station there.
“The passengers found food and overnight accommodations at the house and a big barn sheltered the team of horses on the large 4,000 acre cattle and sheep ranch. There was also a small community school on the property that served the surrounding area.

Today, U.S. Highway 99, south of Cottage Grove passes the red ranch buildings and barns which belong to the present Hawley Land and Cattle Company on the site of Ira Hawley’s Stage Station.

(From OREGON’S MAIN STREET: U.S. Highway 99 “The Folk History” [2014] by Pat Edwards)