Sweet Lorane Community News, April 19, 2018

Fern Ridge Review
Creswell Chronicle
Sweet Lorane Community News
April 19, 2018
By Pat Edwards

Two days, so far, of beautiful sunshine and warm temperatures! I’m in heaven. These 75-year-old bones are getting a bit creaky, so I’ve decided that, this year, I’m going to go at my spring planting and yardwork a little slower than I usually do. I don’t want to pay too dear a price the next day, so my goal is to get at least one major project done each day. Yesterday, I planted my petunia box. It holds 3 dozen plants that I stick through holes drilled through the front and sides of it as well as those that cover the top. Digging the old soil out and freshening it before I layer it on top of the plants protruding from the holes takes a bit of time, so I had a real sense of accomplishment when it was done. I have one more to do at my daughter’s house. I take pride in the fact that I built both boxes with my own hands a couple of years ago and when they are fully in bloom, they are a solid mass of color.

Today, was shrub planting day. Digging three holes and planting shrubs is all the physical work I want to do today since my back has said, “Enough!” but at least I can mark that one off my list now, too. I may even be up to doing some mowing this afternoon after I’ve written this column and worked on my new book a bit. (Fortunately, I use a riding lawnmower.)

The Easy Acres Neighborhood group is inviting the Lorane community to attend a Wildfire Prevention program to be held at the Lorane Grange on Sunday, April 29 at 1:00 to 3:00 p.m.

The program will be conducted by Fire Planning Coordinator, Alex Rahmlow, of the Oregon Department of Forestry, District of Western Lane. We can all benefit from Alex’s presentation by preparing for this year’s fire season. We all know how scary wildfires are after experiencing one really close to home the summer of 2015. 11888121_1625459517709138_4611884414108457338_n

We hope there will be a large turnout, since the more people who care enough to take measures to diminish the chance of wildfires on their property, the safer we all will be.
Just a reminder… the Lorane Christian Church’s Bake Sale and Craft Faire will be held at the Lorane Grange on Saturday, April 28 from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. They are renting tables to display your product for $5 each plus a 10% commission will be charged on sales. I’m going to have one of the tables there for my books, (They are crafts, aren’t they?) and am trying to decide whether or not to bake some goodies, too. I hope to see some familiar faces there that day although I won’t be able to stay to the end. Tracie DeBoer has agreed to watch over my table until closing. Be sure to sign up for a table!
Later, that evening, the Lorane Grange will be holding its Dessert and Bingo Night beginning at 6:00 p.m. It’s for the whole family and the progressive blackout game, played at the very end, is ripe for winning. They also have a 50-50 drawing and great desserts. It’s always a fun evening. Be sure to come if you get the chance.

Here’s an update on the fundraiser for the Crow High School Band trip to Washington, D.C. to represent Oregon in the “Parade of Heroes” that I included in a recent column. Thanks to so many of you out there, they are nearing their goal to guarantee that the band can go. Be sure to send in your donations to the high school office and/or buy a really great-looking t-shirt at https://www.bonfire.com/crow-high-school-band/. It looks like it’s going to happen!

I hope everyone has been enjoy this beautiful weather!

Sweet Lorane Community News, April 13, 2018

Fern Ridge Review
Creswell Chronicle
Sweet Lorane Community News
April 12, 2018
By Pat Edwards

I was so saddened this past week to see the obituary for one of my favorite long-time Lorane residents, Beth Booth. She celebrated her 100th birthday last August and passed quietly away at her home on Stony Point on Easter Sunday.

She lived a remarkable life. She was a regular customer at our store in the late 1970s and ‘80s when I was running it. She came to the store each week to get grain for her beloved horses and other necessities and we would catch up on the news of our respective families. She was an intelligent, vibrant woman who had a soft spot in her heart for animals of all kinds as well as people.

I remember so well the time she wanted to take a trip for a couple of weeks, but was wanting to find someone who she knew would take good care of her home and animals while she was away. It happened that my mother and stepfather, who were spending their first years of retirement in a motorhome, traveling around the country, were going to be in our area during that time. When Beth met them, they immediately bonded and they made arrangements to stay in her home while she was gone.

During that time, I remembered her home as being a wonderfully comfortable, peaceful place. Her spinning wheel was the focal point in her living area and she had many of the items she had knitted from the wool she spun decorating it. To me, it felt like a safe haven mirroring the woman who lived there.

This amazing woman continued to ride and drive her beautiful Morgan horses through her 95th year before she finally hung up her bridle. Our condolences go out to Beth’s loving family. She will be missed by many.

I also want to send out a get-well message to my fellow newspaper columnist, Lil Thompson, who writes the Lorane news for the Cottage Grove Sentinel. She had major back surgery this past week and I hope that she’s up and feeling better soon.

The Ladies of the Lorane Christian Church are sponsoring a Bake and Craft Sale to be held from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the Lorane Grange on Saturday, April 28. For anyone who wants to participate, the table fees are $5. Knowing the reputation the church ladies have for yummy baked goods, you’ll want to get there early!

If you have questions, please call 541-556-6223 for more information. It’s a great opportunity to start out the “sale’n” season since it will be indoors and will take place, rain or shine. Help support the wonderful programs the church puts on for the Lorane community each year.

Just a quick aside to anyone who has cats or kittens that are in need of spaying or neutering… the Petco Foundation has just given a grant to Willamette Animal Guild (WAG) to supplement spaying and neutering of cats. While the funding lasts, the fees for cats is only a $10 co-pay for males or a $20 co-pay for females.
We have taken the feral cats and kittens that wind up at our store over the years to WAG.

They do an excellent job and I highly recommend them. Information and an application form can be found on their website at wagwag.org. Please be a responsible pet owner.

Sweet Lorane Community News, April 5, 2018

Fern Ridge Review
Creswell Chronicle
Sweet Lorane Community News
April 5, 2018
By Pat Edwards

We got the news yesterday that the Crow High School band, led by Music Director Extraordinaire, Pat Dixon, has been selected to represent Oregon in the “Parade of Heroes” in Washington, D.C. over Veterans Day weekend. According to our daughter, Michele Kau, Teacher Extraordinaire at Crow, the band is desperately needing help with funding to make the trip happen. They are accepting cash donations and have begun a fundraising effort by selling really great-looking t-shirts to commemorate the trip. The t-shirt order link can be found on the Lorane, Oregon and Crow Community Facebook pages and more information is available by calling the school at 541-935-2227. Let’s show our pride and help make this happen for our local student/musicians!

Speaking of Crow Middle/High School, we also got word that last week – sometime between Friday, March 30 and Sunday, April 1, someone broke into the auto shop at the high school and stole multiple items that belong to the school. It has been so exciting to see our schools providing vocational classes again for our students and to have this one crippled by tools and equipment being stolen over Spring Break, is very upsetting. If anyone has any information on the theft, please contact the sheriff’s office and the school.

Once again, we don’t have a lot of news to report this week. This time, I’m going to tell you a little about when the stage route that went through Lorane was changed…

A Little Bit of Lorane History:

The Divide landmark is located at the I-5 exit 170. It marks the little-noticed pass that divides the Umpqua River watershed from the Willamette River watershed—Southern Oregon from Northern Oregon. It is here where a traveler can return to U.S. Highway 99, now called the Goshen-Divide Highway, to visit the towns where the highway once brought prosperity.

At one time, there was a post office called Divide that was established on May 31, 1900 and was closed on January 15, 1921. It may have been moved across county borders, or its county designation may have changed in a boundary shift between Lane and Douglas counties.

After 1865, the stagecoaches no longer used the steep Territorial Road to cross the Calapooya Mountains, past the Cartwright House/Mountain House Hotel and Lorane on their way to Eugene City. Instead, they were rerouted by way of an old road which wound through Pass Creek Canyon. The road was poor, soft and muddy along the creek bottom and the canyon passage was narrow.

Robert H. Ward, who lived at the southern end of the new route, built a corduroy road by laying 8-foot cedar logs side by side across the road through the pass. This road became known as Ward’s Toll Road, with Ward collecting a toll from northbound travelers and Ira Hawley collecting the southbound tolls.

On the stage route, Hawley’s Station was located 10 miles north of Estes Ranch on the Ira B. Hawley Donation Land Claim. It provided a rest stop and a horse-changing station there.
“The passengers found food and overnight accommodations at the house and a big barn sheltered the team of horses on the large 4,000 acre cattle and sheep ranch. There was also a small community school on the property that served the surrounding area.

Today, U.S. Highway 99, south of Cottage Grove passes the red ranch buildings and barns which belong to the present Hawley Land and Cattle Company on the site of Ira Hawley’s Stage Station.

(From OREGON’S MAIN STREET: U.S. Highway 99 “The Folk History” [2014] by Pat Edwards)

Sweet Lorane Community News, March 29, 2018

Fern Ridge Review
Creswell Chronicle
Sweet Lorane Community News
March 29, 2018
By Pat Edwards

For the past month (and a little more), I’ve pretty much stayed at home. I had a virus that held on for much too long. I still am dealing with residual symptoms of it as well a painful shoulder that I injured last August, and, most of all, the loss of my friend and colleague, Jo-Brew. I’ve been quietly occupied much of the time, working on writing projects, painting our guest bathroom and taking a lot of naps, but I haven’t tried to get out much.

Contributing to my general ennui, we rehomed one of our sweet Blue Heeler dogs because I realized that Nora really needed to be the only dog in the family. She is now with a couple without children who absolutely worship and spoil her rotten, playing her favorite game of fetch several times each day. We both love and miss her, but we knew that we were being selfish to continue to keep her with Toby who has declared his ownership of Jim and me and resented the attention I, especially, paid to her.

All of this adds up to what I feel was a minor bout of depression. I feel, however, that I’m beginning to step out of the fog I’ve been in and I’m ready to experience more of life again.

It’s time to make plans and to get outside more. I’m making a list of the plants I need to get in the ground soon and to fill two petunia planting boxes I made a couple of years ago for our daughter, Michele, and me. I’ve begun taking notice of all of the small limbs that need to be picked up from this winter’s brush clearing that we had done and the fact that the grass is growing a lot right now. I want to take Toby on some more walks and let the still-crisp air fill me with new energy and life.

Yesterday, I was sent information on a writer’s “summit” that is taking place at Sunriver over Memorial Day weekend. I don’t usually participate in these types of things, but it is offering classes and topics on things that really interest me as a writer and I’m hoping that I can work out a way to go… hopefully, with another good friend and colleague, Jen Chambers.

I’ve also decided to take on a new book project about Capt. John O’Brien that I’ve been hoping to write for quite a few years as part of my Early Lorane Settlers series. I published one on the Bailey family of Bailey Hill last year, so this will be the 2nd in the series. I have already gathered a great deal of information on this fascinating Civil War veteran, newspaper publisher and long-time union organizer. All I’ve needed was an incentive to begin it. I’m finally feeling it! It’s time.

This column is supposed to be about Lorane events and people, but there’s little news to share right now and I feel that by talking about my own experiences occasionally, I am able to let others, who are experiencing the same types of things, know that they are not alone. We all have our bouts of the doldrums occasionally and I’ve learned that it’s ok… it’s part of life. We need to learn to deal with the downs in our lives as well as the joy. Each balances out the other and makes life much more interesting!

And just to make sure this column isn’t totally about me this week, I need to remind everyone about the upcoming annual RAC/Lorane Grange-sponsored Talent Show that will be held on Sunday, April 8 at 3:00 p.m. If you want to participate, give Lil Thompson a call at 541-952-5701.

Happy Spring everyone!

Sweet Lorane Community News, March 22, 2018

Fern Ridge Review
Creswell Chronicle
Sweet Lorane Community News
March 22, 2018
By Pat Edwards

Surprise, surprise! I got up this morning and headed for the utility room to feed our cats. I prepared the food for Xena, our outdoor cat, and promptly opened the door to the covered back deck where she eats and was greeted by a blanket of white. I hadn’t even looked out the window yet, so I was totally caught by surprise. That’s what I get for expounding on the approach of spring in last week’s column!

Today, I’m absolutely stymied as far as a column is concerned, so I’m going to give you an excerpt from my book, From Sawdust and Cider to Wine, about the former Lone Cedar School.

A Bit of Lorane History – The Lone Cedar School

Lone Cedar School

“School District #184 was formed in 1916 because it was difficult for the children living near Gillespie Corners to attend either Green Door School to the south or Hadleyville School to the west. They were a considerable distance from each, and no school buses were in operation at the time.

“The Lone Cedar School was located across Territorial Road from the forks of Simonsen Road near Gillespie Corners. The land was donated for the school by Jesse Hooker and Marcellus Gillespie, and the school house was built in 1918. Classes were held in a one-room woodshed on the property for a couple of years before that, however.

“The school was named for a large, beautifully shaped cedar tree which still stands today between the forks of Simonsen Road. It no longer is beautifully shaped, however, thanks to the Columbus Day Storm that hit the area in 1963.

“…In 1920-1921, Thomas Clark taught the 16-student school. Students that year included Reta Hooker, Juanita Gillespie, Anna Rothauge, Emma Rothauge, Elmo Simonsen, Robert McCay, Anna Lee McCay, Charles Simonsen, Orville Powell, Ellen Cowan, Everett Runk, Roy McCay, Freda Hooker, Jessie Simonsen, Hazel Powell and Arvid Rothauge.

“Arvid Rothauge had a vivid memory of teacher, Tom Clark. The Lone Cedar teaching job was Clark’s first. When the school superintendent hired Clark the spring before he began, the students were warned about the teacher who wouldn’t let any of them get away with any foolishness.

“Because Clark had spent the summer in Alaska, the students were not given a chance to meet this “superhuman” teacher until the first day of school. Much to their surprise, Tom Clark was a ‘wiry, spindly sort of chap,’ shorter than many of the older boys in school. Before any of them could get any ideas about trying to put something over on their teacher, however, Tom Clark drew the four biggest boys in the school aside on the school ground and offered them a challenge. He lay down on the ground and told the boys to try to figure a way to keep him from getting to his feet.

“‘We thought we’d have some fun with the teacher,’ said Arvid, ‘so we all got squared away – one on each leg and arm. We had him sewed down just to a fare-thee-well, you know. We weren’t supposed to hurt him, though.’

“When the boys told him that they were ready, he literally burst up from the ground, tumbling boys all around him.

“‘He never had any trouble with us after that, and everyone liked him from the start.’

“…The school district #184 consolidated with the Lorane School District #36, and the school was closed in 1940.” (From Sawdust and Cider to Wine, 2006)

Sweet Lorane Community News, March 15, 2018

Fern Ridge Review
Creswell Chronicle
Sweet Lorane Community News
March 15, 2018
By Pat Edwards

Spring is definitely in the air. I’ve been feeling it for a long time, but haven’t been able to enjoy it. I caught a nasty virus after our trip to California and it’s taken me over two weeks to even come out of the fog of sinus headaches, constantly dripping nose and cough spasms. My doctor gave me a prescription for antibiotics but told me not to fill it for several days… about halfway into my second week. I can understand the hesitancy with not wanting to use antibiotics unless we absolutely have to, but the fact that we must wait two weeks to get better on our own is a bit daunting.

Anyway, I’ve emerged from the fog finally and have been rebuilding my energy level. I even painted our guest bathroom yesterday. Jim tried mowing the lawn, but it was still a bit too wet, leaving large wet clumps of grass trailing the lawnmower. Soon it will need to be done every few days! I’m ready!

The Lorane Church ladies are holding a bake sale at the Lorane Family Store on Saturday, March 24, beginning at 10:00 a.m. As we have all learned, plan to get there early to have a good selection of all of the yummy cookies, brownies and other sweets that are offered.

Later that evening, the Lorane Grange will have another delicious spaghetti dinner and bingo night starting at 5:30 p.m. The progressive blackout amount continues to grow and is very “winnable,” so be sure to come and enjoy all of the fun and hi-jinx, not to mention the good food.

On Sunday, March 25 at 10:00 a.m., the Lorane Christian Church, will present a moving, inspirational opportunity to experience “The Last Supper” to commemorate Easter by bringing the major biblical event to life. Everyone is invited to take part.

The Lorane talent show will be happening on Sunday, April 8, a week after April Fools Day this year. Actually it would have been a perfect time to schedule it on April 1st. The show runs from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m and it’s free! This fun event is sponsored jointly each year by the Lorane Grange and the Rural Art Center. The organizers try to fit 20 five-minute acts into the program in an hour’s time, so if you’re interested in taking part, figure out what you’d like to share with everyone and sign up for a spot. According to Lisa Livelybrooks, “We have had chicken roping, a professional show tune performance, a clarinet solo, a tap dance, and a burped ABC song.” So build up your courage and get in on the fun. To sign up, send an email to the Rural Art Center at ruralartcenter@gmail.com or contact one of its members or a Lorane Grange member. And… if you’re too chicken or totally lacking in the talent department, mark it on your calendars so you can enjoy watching everyone else perform.

or contact one of its members or a Lorane Grange member. And… if you’re too chicken or totally lacking in the talent department, mark it on your calendars so you can enjoy watching everyone else perform.

Sweet Lorane Community News, March 8, 2018

Fern Ridge Review
Creswell Chronicle
Sweet Lorane Community News
March 8, 2018
By Pat Edwards

Jo and RobinI apologize for the abrupt ending to last week’s column. I was dealt a huge blow in learning about the death of my colleague, Jo-Brew, while I was trying to write it.

Jo, for many years, was a columnist for the Creswell Chronicle and was quite proud of being able to share her essays with its readers. In her recent memoir called Ripples in the Water that I helped her publish just before Christmas 2017, she told about her time there:

When Helen Hollyer, a woman I’d known as a good realtor, but was now the publisher of the Creswell Chronicle, contacted me, I was curious. She asked me to help the Creswell library by bringing my books to sell at a special event featuring local authors. I was thrilled and eager to go. I’m not sure if I sold any books, but I was glad to be there with some of the authors I’d taken workshops from or with.

Helen asked me to consider writing an occasional column for the Creswell Chronicle. I decided to try it and sent one in. Getting a copy of the paper in the mail with my column in it spurred me on and I hurried to send in another. Somehow I kept sending and she kept publishing, weekly, for seven years until she sold the paper.”

For those of you who knew her, the family is planning a celebration of Jo’s life at the Community of Christ Church on March 25, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. It’s located at 1485 Gilham Road, Eugene and all are welcome.

In lieu of flowers, Jo would have encouraged memorial donations to the Lane Library League. Contact information can be found on their website at http://lanelibrary.org/

Randy RampCongratulations to Randy Ramp, son of Monte and Tiny Ramp of Crow, for his nomination as “Administrator of the Year for OCCA” from Sherwood High School where he serves as Athletic Director.

Randy grew up in Crow, graduated from the Crow schools and then was the head girls’ basketball coach at Crow High School during the time our daughters, Michele and Kelly, played there.

A fundraiser is being planned at Papa’s Pizza Parlor Thursday, March 29 beginning at 11:00 a.m. for our hometown hero, Michael Matchulat, who has been battling Stage 4 colorectal cancer for the past couple of years. The purpose is to help defray some of the huge medical expenses he and his wife Amber are facing. Michael’s most recent blog gives you an inside view of what he’s facing.

Michael MatchulatWhy do I act like a five year old at the dessert buffet? Because I love pie… and cake… and Jello. There’s a scan on Monday and as much as I know faithfully as proven fact (hope and pray) that the chemo is working, I have no idea what’s going to happen once the rays go into the Scantron 4000 and it tells someone how much less cancer I’m still fighting.

The five year old is the gauge I have to use now after a painful conversation with one of the pediatric oncology transplant nurses who was being my angel for the day. Kids don’t know anything differently than going to the hospital and getting poisoned in order to live. They go, they soak up the chemicals, and they have a better shot at being a kid longer. And many of them die.

Love your important stuff like a child. Live like that nurse around those children she helps every day so they can smile one more time at whatever they want. Love like that child with the one indicator of pain being the wash of joy from their being. At the bottom of the pile of ashes is what you’re hiding from yourself. It’s always going to be there.

And visit your dessert bar. I’m the first in line. Thank you, Michael.

Reminder: A series of meetings called “Mentoring Ideas to Plans” geared to help us learn how to sharpen and hone our life skills are being offered at the Lorane Grange every Tuesday until May 1 from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Everyone is invited to participate.