Tag: Hadleyville

Sweet Lorane Community News, October 10, 2019

Fern Ridge Review
Creswell Chronicle
Sweet Lorane Community News
October 10, 2019
By Pat Edwards

Last Saturday, the communities of Lorane and Crow honored the life and memory of another of our lifetime residents who descended several generations of family who settled in the area. Shirley McDaniel (Vandecar) Doss passed away on August 25 of this year. I did not hear of her passing for several weeks and I had hoped to attend the recent Celebration of Life for her. Unfortunately, a major family event was held on the same day at the same time, so I wasn’t able to join Shirley’s family and friends after all.

I have known Shirley since the 1970s when we were livestock leaders of the 3-L’s 4-H Livestock Club. It was a community club which I had formed as the Lorane 4-H Coordinator. Shirley was one of our sheep leaders and then she also volunteered to lead a group of 4-H’ers in a vegetable gardening project.

Shirley was close to the land. I remember visiting her one time during the 1970s. She had bottle lambs in her kitchen in a box by the wood stove and she had just separated the milk and cream from the morning’s milking of the cows. She was quiet and unassuming, but a very strong and capable woman.

She used most of the ancestral property to raise sheep and wool. At her passing, she lived on the original ranch that her great-grandparents, Ludig Johannes and Louisa Rebstock Diess, had settled between Gillespie Corners and Hadleyville (Briggs Hill Road) in the late 1870s. I believe that Shirley’s grandfather, Benjamin Franklin “Frank” Diess, built the home west of Powell Road where he and his wife Dora Gates Diess raised their family and where their daughter, Clara Opal Diess (Shirley’s mother) and her husband, Robert McDaniel (her father), raised theirs. It’s where Shirley lived all of her life, and now, Shirley’s daughter, Rose Vandecar, is the 4th generation to live there.

There’s a lot of history surrounding Shirley, and now, Rose. The Diess, Gates and McDaniel families, all which they descended from, have left a huge mark on the Crow and Lorane history. The Gates are well-known in the Crow area, and have many descendants living there still. Opal’s brother, Lincoln Diess, and his wife May, were very active in the Lorane Grange and Lorane School Board for years. Their former home and property is located on the curves of Stony Point.

Many of the McDaniel family, especially, are buried in the McCulloch Cemetery on Briggs Hill Road. For years, Shirley was a board member for the cemetery, and I believe her ashes are there now. It sits on a hilltop surrounded by beautiful vineyards and was the “resting place” my mother chose to be buried.

Shirley and Rose embody a legacy that is disappearing in today’s world by living in and maintaining the home and property of their ancestors. Shirley will be missed by many and my condolences go out to Rose and her family.

Just a quick reminder that the Lorane Grange’s spaghetti family dinner and bingo night will resume Friday, October 18, beginning at 5:30 (dinner) and 6:30 p.m. (bingo).

Sweet Lorane Community News, March 22, 2018

Fern Ridge Review
Creswell Chronicle
Sweet Lorane Community News
March 22, 2018
By Pat Edwards

Surprise, surprise! I got up this morning and headed for the utility room to feed our cats. I prepared the food for Xena, our outdoor cat, and promptly opened the door to the covered back deck where she eats and was greeted by a blanket of white. I hadn’t even looked out the window yet, so I was totally caught by surprise. That’s what I get for expounding on the approach of spring in last week’s column!

Today, I’m absolutely stymied as far as a column is concerned, so I’m going to give you an excerpt from my book, From Sawdust and Cider to Wine, about the former Lone Cedar School.

A Bit of Lorane History – The Lone Cedar School

Lone Cedar School

“School District #184 was formed in 1916 because it was difficult for the children living near Gillespie Corners to attend either Green Door School to the south or Hadleyville School to the west. They were a considerable distance from each, and no school buses were in operation at the time.

“The Lone Cedar School was located across Territorial Road from the forks of Simonsen Road near Gillespie Corners. The land was donated for the school by Jesse Hooker and Marcellus Gillespie, and the school house was built in 1918. Classes were held in a one-room woodshed on the property for a couple of years before that, however.

“The school was named for a large, beautifully shaped cedar tree which still stands today between the forks of Simonsen Road. It no longer is beautifully shaped, however, thanks to the Columbus Day Storm that hit the area in 1963.

“…In 1920-1921, Thomas Clark taught the 16-student school. Students that year included Reta Hooker, Juanita Gillespie, Anna Rothauge, Emma Rothauge, Elmo Simonsen, Robert McCay, Anna Lee McCay, Charles Simonsen, Orville Powell, Ellen Cowan, Everett Runk, Roy McCay, Freda Hooker, Jessie Simonsen, Hazel Powell and Arvid Rothauge.

“Arvid Rothauge had a vivid memory of teacher, Tom Clark. The Lone Cedar teaching job was Clark’s first. When the school superintendent hired Clark the spring before he began, the students were warned about the teacher who wouldn’t let any of them get away with any foolishness.

“Because Clark had spent the summer in Alaska, the students were not given a chance to meet this “superhuman” teacher until the first day of school. Much to their surprise, Tom Clark was a ‘wiry, spindly sort of chap,’ shorter than many of the older boys in school. Before any of them could get any ideas about trying to put something over on their teacher, however, Tom Clark drew the four biggest boys in the school aside on the school ground and offered them a challenge. He lay down on the ground and told the boys to try to figure a way to keep him from getting to his feet.

“‘We thought we’d have some fun with the teacher,’ said Arvid, ‘so we all got squared away – one on each leg and arm. We had him sewed down just to a fare-thee-well, you know. We weren’t supposed to hurt him, though.’

“When the boys told him that they were ready, he literally burst up from the ground, tumbling boys all around him.

“‘He never had any trouble with us after that, and everyone liked him from the start.’

“…The school district #184 consolidated with the Lorane School District #36, and the school was closed in 1940.” (From Sawdust and Cider to Wine, 2006)

Sweet Lorane Community News – January 12, 2017

Fern Ridge Review
Creswell Chronicle
Sweet Lorane Community News
January 12, 2017
By Pat Edwards

Fortunately, the predicted ice storm that I mentioned in last week’s column produced few power outages in our area… no more big limbs or trees came down at our place, but it did cause many of us to be homebound for several more days while we waited for the roads to clear of the ice-crusted snow that remained from the previous week. The roads were clear and even dry in most spots today (Thursday) when I made a 10:00 a.m. appointment in Eugene, but I still need to put my little Jeep Compass in 4WD just to get out of our driveway. Snow, snow, go away; Come again… next winter, please! I don’t know about

There’s some Lorane news to report, but not much. Most of us have been so intent on staying warm and staying on our feet when we venture outside that we’re not making many plans.

I missed getting the information on the David Doughty celebration of life into last week’s column. It will take place on Saturday, January 14 at the Deep Woods event center in Elmira, so it will already have passed by the time you read this. Knowing how much David was respected and loved by our community, I have no doubt that there will be a packed house for his funeral. He was a good man.

For those interested in becoming members, the Lorane Grange will meet on Thursday, January 19 at 7:00 p.m… a new time. Their next Spaghetti Dinner and Bingo night is scheduled for Saturday, January 28. Dinner will begin at 5:30 p.m. and bingo for the whole family starts at 6:30 p.m. It’s a fun, raucous time and I hope to see a big crowd there. Proceeds go towards maintenance of the hall. Contact Lil Thompson (541-942-5701) if you have any questions about grange membership and/or the upcoming events.

Many of you know that somehow, over the years, I have gotten involved in researching, writing and publishing local history information… first, Lorane’s and then the history of U.S. Highway 99 through Oregon. I never was a history scholar in school, so it’s surprising that I’ve grown to love it so much in my later years.

I’ve written an open letter to the people of Lorane and Crow to try to interest you in establishing a written and pictorial history of our area extending beyond the boundaries that were in place for our research on Lorane for the 1987 and 2006 editions of Sawdust and Cider; A History of Lorane, Oregon and the Siuslaw Valley. I’d like to concentrate on families living in the area lying between Lorane and Crow and Crow, itself… i.e. Gillespie Corners, Simonsen Road, Powell Road, Hadleyville (Briggs Hill Road), Doane Road and on into Crow.

When  Nancy O’Hearn, Marna Hing and I researched the Lorane history in the 1980s, we were able to conduct interviews of the people whose ancestors were some of its earliest settlers. We were told first-hand stories of the early part of the 1900s and were given access to vintage pictures from personal family albums. Most of those people we interviewed who had grown up in the early 1900s – my generation’s parents and grandparents – have passed on. In fact, those in my generation, born in the 1940s and 1950s, are now the “old timers.”

There is a lot of interest in the stories, pictures and information shared by those who lived in the early-to-mid 1900s. I’ve seen the interest first-hand and I worry that area histories that have not yet been documented might be lost.

I would like to set up a depository of stories, photos, letters, diaries and other documents so that they can be recorded and published and can be shared for generations. I can donate my time in organizing the information, editing, doing the layout and publishing everything as a book, but I no longer have the time or energy level to take on the info-gathering portion of such a project.

If this is something the community wants to do, then I would love to see it happen as a community project. Proceeds for book sales could go towards community needs and events.

If you’re interested in participating in this project, please read the full letter for more information. It’s posted on the Lorane, Oregon Facebook page. You can also contact me at edwards@groundwaterspublishing.com for a copy of the letter and/or for the guidelines for submitting photos and other material.

It’s up to you whether or not it happens.