Tag: COVID-19 vaccinations

Sweet Lorane Community News, May 13, 2021

Fern Ridge Review
Creswell Chronicle
Sweet Lorane Community News
May 13, 2021
By Pat Edwards

Yesterday, Jim and I were ecstatic to hear the announcement from the Center for Disease Control (CDC), that our country has reached the point in our continued fight against COVID-19 where all of us who are fully vaccinated will no longer be expected to wear masks or socially distance except in certain situations (i.e. assisted living centers, medical offices and hospitals, on public transportation, etc.) where masks might still be mandated. This was personally wonderful news, but we realize that there are still many who are holding off in getting the vaccine until they feel more confident in its safety. I respect legitimate concerns. Looking at the fact of how many doses have been administered in the U.S. and how few serious allergic reactions have occurred, however, my hope is that our nation is able to reach its projected goal of 70% vaccinated by July 4.

For me, this has never been a political issue. Over my 78 years, I’ve seen the benefits of other vaccines that have controlled, or even wiped out, polio, smallpox, HIV, diphtheria, measles and so many other diseases that threatened our population. Wearing masks have not been fun, but they have proven effective in protecting those of us who have used them. Now that it’s available, we have chosen to be vaccinated and we are taking that first big step back to normalcy… we no longer have to wear masks. That, in itself, is worth the one or two pokes in the arm that will ensure that, as a nation, we can gain control of this terrible disease that has killed so many in just a year’s time.

Please get vaccinated. Don’t do it for me—I’m protected. Do it for yourself and for your loved ones who’d like to keep you around for awhile longer. Yes… most likely you’ll survive COVID-19 if you get it, but are you really willing to take that chance?

Sweet Lorane Community News, February 25, 2021

Fern Ridge Review
Creswell Chronicle
Sweet Lorane Community News
February 25, 2021
By Pat Edwards

Yeah! Jim and I were able to get our first COVID-19 vaccine shots last Sunday. We pre-registered with the Lane County Public Health department and once our age groups became eligible, we watched my email account for invitations to schedule our appointments. Jim was eligible a week before I was, and two days after I became eligible, the invitation arrived. It was an easy process. We were allowed to select the time(s) we wanted to get the shot the following Sunday. A pop-up list appeared with available times and how many shots were available for each. I selected 10:45 a.m. for both of us and noticed that there were 33 injections available at that time. We were to report to a large parking area above Lane Community College.

That morning, we left an hour early, although the drive to LCC usually only takes us a little over a half hour. I wanted to make sure that if we were delayed in any manner along the way, that we wouldn’t be late. With almost a half hour to spare, we decided to park in the Albertson’s parking lot at the bottom of the hill for about 15 minutes so we could again read the instructions showing us where we needed to go once we got to LCC, in order to kill some time. We noticed that people in a couple of other cars in the lot seemed to be doing the same thing. With 15 minutes to go, we pulled out and headed up 30th to LCC, thinking that they might have us wait a little longer at one of their lower parking areas until 10:45 rolled around. But, we masked up and proceeded up the hill once we arrived on campus and followed the cars ahead of us to the top where there were several white tents set up and quite a few parking attendants, in orange vests, telling us what line to get into. After our reservations had been verified with the authorization codes that had been issued to us, a felt-tip marker was used to put two marks on our car’s windshield to indicate that both of us were authorized to get the vaccine.

Then, we were each given a clipboard with paperwork to be filled out. Unfortunately, I only had one pen in my purse, so at the next stop, I asked to borrow another pen so I wouldn’t be holding up the line by filling out both of our forms myself. By then, we were under one of the white tents and were cheerfully greeted by the volunteer who would be administering our shots to us through the car windows. Even though we had been asked to list any severe reactions we have had to vaccinations on the paperwork, she checked with us about any allergies to medication we may have had in the past. I told her about two meds that I am allergic to, and she asked me about my reactions to each (hives for one and swelling of my lips for another). She explained that because of this, after the shot was administered, we would have to pull into a small parking area reserved for those who must remain for another 30 minutes to be watched for possible reactions to the COVID-19 vaccine. It was a price I was more than willing to pay.

Once she was sure that we were ready to get our shots, as the driver of the car, I was given mine in my left arm and Jim, as passenger, got his in his right bicep. It was a wonderful feeling as she pulled the needle from my arm. I felt freer at that moment than I have felt for over a year. We were then handed our cards showing the date, time and identifying number of the Pfizer vaccine lot we had been given. The volunteer then looked at her watch and recorded the time on my windshield so that my 30-minute quarantine could begin from that point; then, she pointed out where we needed to park and informed us that we would be notified in 3 weeks about the booster shot. Within a half hour, we were on our way back home. We have had no adverse reactions to the vaccine other than the usual, very mild, and hardly noticeable soreness at the vaccine site.

The whole process was so well-organized that we have nothing but praise for the LCPH employees and volunteers who planned it. Thank you!

I encourage everyone as they become eligible and who have not had their first vaccination yet, to pre-register with the Lane County Public Health department on-line or, for those who do not have internet access, by phone at 541-682-1380. More venues are becoming available, but this one through LCPH seems to be the main source of the vaccinations currently.

We can do this! We just might be able to resume “life” again by this summer. Fingers crossed!

Sweet Lorane Community News, February 11, 2021

Fern Ridge Review
Creswell Chronicle
Sweet Lorane Community News
February 11, 2021
By Pat Edwards

This week, Jim became eligible for the COVID-19 vaccination. He is 81 years of age, and we are eagerly awaiting the phone call or email that will give him a time to go in for his first shot. It’s been a long time coming, and we are so thankful that our son, a granddaughter and Jim’s brother, John, have already been vaccinated. Our daughter, Michele, who is a teacher, will be getting hers next week, too. We know that, even after we have received the vaccine, we will need to continue being masked—which is no big deal, really—and socially distance until enough vaccines have been administered to make it safe to discontinue the practices that have become almost “normal.” But, I am anxious to once again be able to visit John and his wife, Vicki, who are very special friends as well as family members… it’s been too long. We have been able to occasionally spend some time with younger members of our family this past year, but our fear of possibly passing on the virus to John, especially, whose health is compromised, has kept us away.

I also look forward to the day—possibly next summer?—when we can join John and Vicki in attending a drama or a soaring musical at the Cottage Theater where their daughter, Tracy, has been a popular member of the cast in many plays, and an amazing singer.

We long for the day when we can go to town and have a leisurely lunch or dinner with each other, family or friends. Right now, when we go in to run store errands, we pick up a hamburger or sub sandwich and sit in my car to eat. It takes the fun out of lunch. The one exception that we’ve found is when we go to Taco Time in Eugene and park under a couple of fir trees in the parking lot there. There’s a resident squirrel who frequently will climb down the tree and beg for some rice from my veggie burrito, or some “tater-tot” crumbs that we toss out the window. He’s quite entertaining.

I’m trying to plan for the day when we can take a road trip or a full-blown vacation, too. They say that planning for a trip is half the fun. I don’t know about that, but it gives us something to think about.

As we work our way out from under the pandemic cloud that’s been hanging over us for so long, we are also counting our blessings. We are surrounded and protected and loved by our family who always has prioritized our welfare. We’ve been able to snuggle our great-grandbabies who are almost out of the snuggling stage now, and watch all of them grow and lead happy, joyous childhoods as every child should. Videos and photographs sent to us show Harper reading her first book, and Hayden, all by herself, catching her first lamb that escaped from their family’s holding pens. Then there’s toddler, Shiloh, helping to herd the lambs down the lane at the ranch, and little Cora taking it all in from her baby carrier on her mommy’s back.

Sawyer, who loves tractors and trucks, and his little brother, Hudson, come to visit occasionally and he heads right for the framed photo of his “Papa” on a tractor, that sits on a table in our living room. He immediately jabbers about the tractor and then points out who is sitting on top of it.

Miss Calliope just turned one recently and she gives both Papa and GiGi huge smiles when she sees us and holds her arms out for us to take her.
Then, there’s our newest little one, Josie—our daughter, Stacey’s, first granddaughter. We look forward to some cuddle time with her soon.

The world is looking a bit brighter and we all need to count our blessings—more now, than ever. It’s going to get better… but we need to make sure that we take each step as it comes so that “better” lasts a long time.