Sweet Lorane Community News, May 16, 2019

Fern Ridge Review
Creswell Chronicle
Sweet Lorane Community News
May 16, 2019
By Pat Edwards

Yesterday, I was considering asking my editors, Pam and Erin, if I could take a 2-week hiatus from writing my column. I have reported all of the upcoming events and happenings in Lorane and Crow that I’m aware of in previous columns. My focus, right now, is so centered on our personal lives, that I haven’t tried to seek out any other news. But, there seems to be quite a bit of interest recently from my readers about what’s happening with our situation that I thought I’d at least give you an update this week.

First of all, we learned last week from Jim’s orthopedic doctor that his recent pelvic fracture that he’s been recovering from turned out to be three fractures—not just one—according to the most recent x-ray at his follow-up appointment. I am so proud of how well he has dealt with it throughout the last couple of months of healing… despite having to put up with a tyrannical wife/caretaker and some very bossy daughters. He hasn’t had a chance to misbehave. It’s meant so much to both of us to be surrounded by family who have always been willing to take an active part in our lives… even from afar.

Washington DCThis week is especially hectic. We’re working around Jim’s mobility issues and putting aside some medical issues I’ll have to deal with on our return as Jim and I and my sister and brother-in-law, Barbara and Dwight Isborn, are preparing to embark on an exciting vacation to Washington, D.C. and the things we’ve always wanted to see first hand. We’ll spend four days there. Then, we’ll visit Mt. Vernon, Yorktown, Williamsburg, Jamestown, Monticello, Staunton, Richmond, the Shenandoah Valley, Harper’s Ferry, Gettysburg, and the Valley Forge National Park. On our 11th day, we’ll fly home from Philadelphia where we’ll also have a chance to see the Liberty Bell.

FlagI’ve always been a patriot, even as a child, and despite the current political situation, we are all looking forward to seeing the national monuments, the centers of government and the national treasures as well as honoring the veterans that the war memorials represent. I want to immerse myself in the history that I’ve read about. I will especially enjoy stepping back into the 1700s in Williamsburg where the whole town is a live re-enactment of the colonial days.

Thank goodness for family, a reliable house-sitter and a great line-up of store employees to hold down the fort while we are gone.

I probably will have to forego my column next week, but I’ll have lots to tell you about when we get back.

Sweet Lorane Community News, May 09, 2019

Fern Ridge Review
Creswell Chronicle
Sweet Lorane Community News
May 9, 2019
By Pat Edwards

As I promised last week, here are the details on the Spring Cemetery Clean-up project with the Lorane Grange…

Lorane Grange members and volunteers from the community will be meeting at 9:00 a.m. on Tuesday, May 14, at the Lorane Grange Cemetery to spruce up, mow and ready the cemetery for Memorial Day. If you want to help, contact a grange member or just show up with gloves and whatever tools/equipment you’d like to use for the project.

The Grange is also planning a workday on Tuesday, May 21, to do the same types of things in and around the grange property on Old Lorane Road. There are lots of things to do both days, so your help you offer will be welcomed.

The Crow-Applegate-Lorane School Board meets at the Applegate Elementary School on Thursday, May 16 at 7:00 p.m. Find out more about the process of keeping our local schools funded and running efficiently in the education of our local youth and lend your voice.

Also, be sure to vote on Tuesday, May 21, in the Lane County Special Election. Your ballot includes a measure proposing the renewal of the five-year local option levy for general school operations. In addition, two school board positions are up for election this year. Incumbent, Doug Perry, is running uncontested in Position #1. The incumbent of Position #2, Troy Wilson, is being challenged by Lorane parent, Crystal Nevins.

Also, two Lorane Fire District positions are uncontested, with Jeri Porter running for Position #1 and Martin McClure in Position #2. Thank you to each of these community residents for offering your time and abilities in serving Lorane and Crow!

Crow High School Seniors are gearing up for graduation week. On Wednesday, May 29, Senior Recognition will be held at 7:00 p.m. in the high school gymnasium. Then, on Sunday, June 2, they will be honored at a 6:00 p.m. Baccalaureate service at the Crow Nazarene Church. The CHS graduation, itself, will be held on Friday, June 7, beginning at 7:00 p.m. in the gymnasium.

For those who are interested in pre-registering to participate in the 2019 Crow Car Show this summer, you have only until May 15 to receive the early registration discount. The show, to be held on Saturday, July 13, will be its 16th annual fundraiser benefitting the Crow-Applegate-Lorane School District. The one held in 2018 was its largest ever with a total of 141 cars on display. Registration forms can be downloaded at http://www.crowboosterclub.com/crowcarshow or you can email crowcarshow@yahoo.com.

For those of you who have not yet burned your brush piles from this winter’s devastation, you may have to wait now until after the fall rains begin. The Lane Regional Air Protection Agency (LRAPA) has temporarily suspended outdoor burning throughout Lane County due to high fire danger. Let’s be good neighbors and respect this ruling to make sure that Lane County doesn’t contribute to early grass or forest fires in Oregon.
Enjoy these beautiful late spring/early summer days while the grass and trees bear the freshness of new growth, everyone! I believe that it’s my favorite time of year.

Sweet Lorane Community News, May 2, 2019

Fern Ridge Review
Creswell Chronicle
Sweet Lorane Community News
May 2, 2019
By Pat Edwards

May has arrived, my flower beds and boxes are taking shape, and the pace of life is obviously speeding up a bit for everyone. With the sunshine and warmer temperatures, there is suddenly the desire to get out and “do something.”

At its meeting this past week, the Lorane Grange discussed the annual booth at the Lane County Fair as well as its spring clean-up of the Grange Cemetery which sits on the hill next to King Estate. I know that they will welcome volunteers to help with the cemetery. Contact Gary or Lil Thompson or any other grange member if you would like to participate. I’ll try to include details in next week’s column.

For those of us who love and care for our “Lorane Warrior,” Michael Matchulat, he could use a few more of our thoughts and prayers at this time. Jim and I are sending ours.

Last Wednesday morning, there was a very interesting event taking place at Crow High/Middle School, but it was one I opted to find out more about after-the-fact. They held a pre-prom assembly that strangely held a bit more meaning to me than it normally would have. Outside the school, a real-life re-enactment of a horrific car crash took place. Two cars were involved in what was described as a car-full of teenagers who had been drinking, on their way home after the prom. The other car had adults in it who were unlucky enough to have been in the wrong place at the wrong time. The scenario involved real-life paramedics, ambulances and life-flight crews who were on hand to remove and tend to the passenger casualties from the wreckages.

The roles of the passengers were played by school students and teachers… among them, our daughter, Michele Kau. Each one of the role-players were made up to show specific injuries and conditions. From the pictures I saw, there was lots of “blood” and makeup to show “wounds” and “broken bones.” I understand that it was very realistic and, according to Michele, “It impacted a lot of kids in a way that will hopefully make them think twice about making dangerous choices.”

I applaud the school for providing this wake-up call to its students. The reason I decided not to witness it was fairly obvious… it was gruesome… but what clinched the decision was the fact that I could not bear the thought of watching the “jaws of life” extricate my daughter’s supposedly “dead body” from a crumbled wreckage. That just hits too close to home.

On a sunnier note, I have been noticing, this spring, an unusual abundance of beautiful blue flowers in the pastures around Lorane, probably due to our recent flooding—they like to grow in moist meadows. These flowers are the blue camas, and they were a very popular and cultivated food source for the Native American tribes who lived in this area. After being harvested in the spring and early summer months, the bulbs were pit-roasted or boiled. According to Wikipedia, “A pit-cooked camas bulb looks and tastes something like baked sweet potato, but sweeter, and with more crystalline fibers due to the presence of inulin in the bulbs…”

Camas

Photo by Martin McClure of Lorane

Seeing these beautiful flowers in the fields provides a connection to the past for me.

A Bit of Lorane History

“The nearest tribes in the area were the Chelamela, the Yoncalla Kalapuyas, the Siuslaws, and the Lower Umpquas. All spoke Chinook jargon, made up of 500 words, which evolved from the various tribes. Primarily, they had the same type of life-style. Their chief food sources came from the abundant plant and animal life in the Siuslaw Valley. Their main staples were acorns, hazelnuts, camas, fish, roots, game and berries. The local tribes regularly practiced field burning to harvest dried wild wheat pods and to control the growth of vegetation. They took advantage each fall of the plentiful supply of salmon provided during the salmon runs in the Siuslaw and Smith Rivers and the connecting streams…

“…Each spring, the members of the tribes would often leave for their favorite hunting or gathering grounds, living in temporary shelters all throughout the spring and summer months. There were no strict territorial boundaries between the tribes and most seemed to agree that no man should own the land, and they respected the areas where their neighbors dwelled…” (From Sawdust & Cider, 1987, 2006)